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Visiting Learmonth Cemetery

It’s been a while since I shared a post about my family research, and although this cemetery visit was a couple of months ago I’ve been meaning to sit down and write about it since March! I went to Daylesford for the Labor Day long weekend this year.  About half an hour from Daylesford is a small town named Learmonth where I believed one of my ancestors, John Rankin, to be buried.  I had already seen two photos of the grave on the Australian Cemeteries website, but as you can see from this photo it wasn’t possible to make out the full text on the headstone.  The information recorded on the Australian Cemeteries listing was only partial, and it seemed very likely this was my John Rankin, but I couldn’t be sure from what was available online.

Being so close it was a great opportunity to stop in and visit the cemetery and visit his grave in person.

John Rankin's grave as seen on the Australian Cemeteries website

John Rankin’s grave as seen on the Australian Cemeteries website

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New South Wales Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages

Following from my post last week summarising the information available from the Victorian Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages, this week I’m going to take a look at the New South Wales Registry.

While my research hasn’t been as involved in NSW as it has in Victoria, to date I have 7 resources in my family tree from the NSW Registry spanning all three event types giving me some experience using this registry.

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Victorian Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages - logo

Victorian Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages

I started researching my family tree at the beginning of last year. During my initial research I spent a lot of time searching the various state Birth, Death and Marriage indexes. I’ve decided to write a series of blog posts summarising the information available in each registry and tips I’ve picked up along the way for getting the most of out the registries. For more information on my research and links to the other posts in this series as they become available, head to my Family History page.

I’ll be starting with the Victorian registry since that is where my research began. This post also comes at a good time because a significant changes have recently been made to the Victorian registry online.

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Ok Google…Is there anything you don’t know?

Since Google Now first appeared on my Nexus 4 in 2013 I’ve been continually impressed by the little bits of information it has offered up.  At first it was the small things like the weather in my current location, or if I was away from home then it would let me know what the weather was like in my home suburb as well.  Then my mobile phone started offering directions to addresses or businesses I had just searched for on my PC.

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Pallet Garden

At the end of last year I saw some vertical gardens on Pinterest made from old pallets. The idea appealed to me, and I decided to try making my own. Fortunately there was a spare pallet on the job site where my brother was working, so he brought it home for me to use.

There are plenty of guides on the internet explaining how to make one, including this one on the Bunnings website. I read a few guides and ended up taking ideas from several. Here’s the result!

This post has become quite lengthy, so I’ve divided it into four key sections:

  1. Prepare your pallet
  2. Fill the pallet with dirt
  3. Plant your garden
  4. Make it vertical

At the end you’ll also find some handy tips I’ve learnt after maintaining the garden for a year.  Post a comment if you build one of your own or have any feedback!

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Falls Creek 2015

Skiing at Falls Creek

On Friday I arrived home from a week at Falls Creek.  We had amazing weather, and there was lots of snow coverage. I carried my Bryton Rider 20+ in my jacket pocket to track my runs, and loaded them up into the BrytonSport website.

Here’s a handy Google Map layering our tracks from each day, and a few photos from on the mountain.

In total we covered 163.93km, reaching a maximum speed of 54.9kph on the last day towards the bottom of Big Dipper. Looking forward to going back next year and trying to beat my speed!

Posted from Falls Creek, Victoria, Australia.

The two O'Connell graves located at Melbourne General Cemetery

Returning to Melbourne General Cemetery

Following my visit to the Melbourne General Cemetery just after Christmas, I returned on New Year’s Day when the office was open. When I first visited, I had a copy of the cemetery record for plot 767 which listed four people. When I found the grave, there were five people listed on the tombstone – two people were missing from the record, and two others were missing on the tombstone. I was hoping the staff at the cemetery could help explain the discrepancy. It turned out to be a very worthwhile visit!

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Posted from Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Inscription on the grave of William and Daniel O'Connell's family grave

Tracking down my ancestors’ graves

Yesterday I went on an adventure to three cemeteries in Melbourne, to track down the graves of my ancestors. I was able to find the three graves I was searching for at the Melbourne General Cemetery, Boroondara Cemetery in Kew, and Box Hill Cemetery. It was a very rewarding experiences, making my ancestors seem more real and adding a new layer of depth to my family tree with the photos I’ve taken.

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Posted from Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Spices and curry paste

Cooking with Poo

Today was my last day in Thailand. Victoria and I had booked a cooking class at the Helping Hands Thai Cooking school. The lessons are run by a lady called Poo (Poo is actually her nick name, derived from her full name Champoo – Thai for rose apple). Poo lives in the Klong Toey area of Bangkok, where she used to run a small food stall. She was only making just enough money to feed her family, when the Helping Hands organisation approached her and helped to set up a cooking school. With some help from her catchy nickname, her Cooking With Poo classes are now very popular! Other residents of Klong Toey also benefit from the business, supplying aprons, cloth bags and raw materials used in the classes. If you’re interested in the class, I’d highly recommend it! Check out the Cooking with Poo website or Facebook page.

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Posted from Bangkok, Bangkok, Thailand.

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Pak Khlong Talat and Chinatown

After a full day at Ayutthaya, I was ready for a quiet day on Wednesday. After a sleep in, Victoria and I went to a shopping centre called Terminal 21. Each floor is themed like a different country, and the signs above the escalators are like airport boarding gates. We checked out the theme on each floor, and stopped in at an impressive Rome themed toilet. I bought a tshirt and a funky bow tie, and we had lunch in the food court. It was a nice lazy way to start the day!

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Posted from Bangkok, Bangkok, Thailand.